Umar ibn al-Khattab

Omar Series with English Subtitles

Omar Series with English Subtitles

A series made by MBC. Watch to makes you love the sahaba more and more. Umar Ibn Al-Khattab raḍyAllāhu ‘anhu (may Allāh be pleased with him) is a pioneering figure in the Islāmic world. He was a leader, a statesman, a pious and God conscious Muslim who showed respect for all people including non-Muslims and he ordered the Muslims to treat non-Muslims with respect. He showed us how to apply the Quranic injunction “there is no compulsion in religion.”   Sayings of Umar ibn Al-Khattab :  ”The wisest man is he who can account for his actions”...

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Umar Ibn al-Khattab amongst the most influential people of all time

Umar Ibn al-Khattab amongst the most influential people of all time

Michael H. Hart wrote a book entitled “THE 100: A Ranking of the Most Influential Persons in History” in 1978. Several other authors have written similar books but this still remains a distinguished book in its category. The book is thought provoking and encourages the reader to see history from different perspectives. He chose Prophet Muhammad to lead the list of the world’s most influential persons which was surprising to many people. He said he chose Muhammad because he was the only person in the history who was supremely successful on both the religious and secular levels. Michael Hart went on to count the traits and qualities of Prophet Muhammad and his overall impact on human history and arrived at the conclusion that Prophet Muhammad should be the number one person in the filed of 100 influential persons in human history. Another surprise to many people was Michael Hart’s choice of Umar Ibn Al-Khattab  among the 100 influential persons, whom he not only included among these 100 persons but also put him as number two on the second half (51 to 100) of his choice. Umar Ibn Al-Khattab  is 52nd on the list. He ranked him higher than such famous men as Charlemagne and Julius Caesar. He further says that Umar’s brilliant leadership was responsible for the expansion of the Islāmic territory and the enormous extent that it did occur under him. He further says that Umar Ibn Al-Khattab ordered the Muslim armies to leave the natives of the conquered land in peace and ordered the military personnel not to force the natives to convert to Islam. In the parenthesis Michael put his note, “From the above, it is clear that the Arab conquest was more a nationalist war of conquest rather than a holy war, although the religious aspect was not lacking”. Michael Hart further says that Umar ibn Al-Khattab’s achievements are impressive and it would be a grave mistake to ignore his contributions to humanity. It should be noted that Umar Ibn Al-Khattab’s brilliant leadership was responsible for permanence of the territories that came under the Islāmic role at that time and are still part of the Islāmic world today. Umar Ibn Al-Khattab  is a pioneering figure in the Islāmic world. He was a leader, a statesman, a pious and God conscious Muslim who showed respect for all people including non-Muslims and he ordered the Muslims to treat non-Muslims with respect. He showed us how to apply the Quranic injunction “there is no compulsion in religion.” Under the leadership of Umar ibn Al-Khattab  Islam spread widely not by the sword but by virtue of its beauty, simplicity, transparency, openness and the leadership provided by him. Another reason...

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The Rightly Guided Caliphs

The Rightly Guided Caliphs

  With the death of Muhammad , the Muslim community was faced with the problem of succession. Who would be its leader? There were four persons obviously marked for leadership: Abu Bakr al-Siddiq , who had not only accompanied Muhammad to Medina ten years before, but had been appointed to take the place of the Prophet as leader of public prayer during Muhammad’s last illness; ‘Umar ibn al-Khattab , an able and trusted Companion of the Prophet; ‘Uthman ibn ‘Affan , a respected early convert; and ‘Ali ibn Abi Talib  , Muhammad’s cousin and son-in-law. To avoid contention among various groups, ‘Umar suddenly grasped Abu Bakr’s hand, the traditional sign of recognition of a new leader. Soon everyone concurred and before dusk Abu Bakr   had been recognized as the khalifah of Muhammad. Khalifah- anglicized as caliph – is a word meaning “successor” but also suggesting what his historical role would be: to govern according to the Quran and the practice of the Prophet. Abu Bakr’s   caliphate was short but important. An exemplary leader, he lived simply, assiduously fulfilled his religious obligations, and was accessible and sympathetic to his people. But he also stood firm when, in the wake of the Prophet’s death, some tribes renounced Islam; in what was a major accomplishment, Abu Bakr swiftly disciplined them. Later, he consolidated the support of the tribes within the Arabian Peninsula and subsequently funnelled their energies against the powerful empires of the East: the Sassanians in Persia and the Byzantines in Syria, Palestine, and Egypt. In short, he demonstrated the viability of the Muslim state. The second caliph, ‘Umar- appointed by Abu Bakr in a written testament – continued to demonstrate that viability. Adopting the title Amir al-Muminin, “Commander of the Believers,” ‘Umar extended Islam’s temporal rule over Syria, Egypt, Iraq, and Persia in what from a purely military standpoint were astonishing victories. Within four years after the death of the Prophet the Muslim state had extended its sway over all of Syria and had, at a famous battle fought during a sandstorm near the River Yarmuk, blunted the power of the Byzantines – whose ruler Heraclius had shortly before disdainfully rejected the letter from the unknown Prophet of Arabia. Even more astonishingly, the Muslim state administered the conquered territories with a tolerance almost unheard of in that age. At Damascus, for example, the Muslim leader Khalid ibn al-Walid signed a treaty which read as follows: This is what Khalid ibn al-Walid would grant to the inhabitants of Damascus if he enters therein: he promises to give them security for their lives, property and churches. Their city wall shall not be demolished, neither shall any Muslim be quartered in their houses....

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